Brain Integration

Right and left brain hemispheres

The left brain hemisphere is the language-processing centre. The right brain is used for spatial judgment, movement, drawing, music, mathematics and technical abilities. Brain integration is one of the keys to improving memory, concentration, creativity, energy levels, IQ, EQ and many other markers of intelligence.

Sound therapy works on both sides to develop areas where we might be weak and improve communication between the hemispheres. For this reason Sound Therapy listeners often find themselves developing new abilities and overcoming blocks.

Why are high frequencies important for the Brain?

Through his study of embryology, Tomatis realised that the first sounds we hear are high frequency sounds because the area of the cochlea which detects high frequencies is the first to develop.

Through his experiments Tomatis showed that high frequency sounds serve as a vital and necessary stimulant for cortical activity. The brain needs high frequencies in order to be fully functional. The electrical charge of the brain, the energy on which it runs, needs to be regularly replenished and Tomatis discovered a way to do this by using specially processed sounds.
 

The cerebellum

The cerebellum plays a significant role in sensory co-ordination, both visual and auditory, and has been dubbed the autopilot of the brain. It is an area of the brain about the size of your fist, which sits behind the brainstem at the base of your skull. Sound Therapy researchers now believe that any learning difficulty associated with auditory processing problems is linked to the cerebellum.

Researchers are only now beginning to unravel the deeply important role of the cerebellum, for while it directs no specific body functions, it operates as monitor and coordinator of the brain’s other centres and as mediator between them and the body.

It has been known for some time that the cerebellum was responsible for the management of the body’s equilibrium and muscular activity. However, it has more recently come to light that the cerebellum is equally involved in the co-ordination of the sensations of touch, hearing and sight.

Sound Therapy brings about improved function and brain integration of cerebellar pathways and this means that many areas of our sensory and motor function are improved.

To learn more about how Sound Therapy improves neural functioning, request one of our Free Reports.

Sports

Athletes of all levels stand to improve their performance through the use of Sound Therapy. Though sports performance may seem a far cry form listening to music, in fact they are closely related. Movement and music are two different, but very effective ways of stimulating the brain. Recent advances in the fields of learning difficulties and chiropractic neurology clearly indicate that co-ordination, spatial calculation and response speed can be stimulated if auditory processing is improved. The part of the brain now known to be intimately involved in this connection is the cerebellum, which integrates many of the automatic functions of the body. Sound Therapy may assist with sports performance for a wide range of people from those who have poor co-ordination to top level athletes wishing to maximise their abilities.

Some of the specific ways that Sound Therapy may improve sports performance include:

  • Deeper, more refreshing sleep
  • Higher energy levels
  • Improved spatial judgement
  • Faster processing speed
  • Greater motivation
  • Improved sensory integration
  • More efficient automatic functions including breathing and heart rate
  • Better balance
  • Improved posture
  • Better joint flexibility
  • Reduced pain levels
  • Improved muscle tone
  • Steadier emotions

Testimonials

To learn more about how Sound Therapy could improve sport performance, request one of our Free Reports.

Music

If you work in a musical field whether it is composing, playing an instrument or singing, Sound Therapy may increase your abilities and satisfaction in this area. Musicians, singers and music lovers report increased auditory perception, greater awareness of tones, frequencies and the emotional impact of music. At the same time, performance is enhanced. Whether you sing in the church choir or perform as a soloist, Sound Therapy is likely to give you both increased ability and enjoyment of your art. The ability to reproduce certain notes, to be inspired to create and interpret, just to enjoy listening, are all lifted to new heights.

This is not surprising, since the sense of listening is fundamental to musical performance and appreciation. If part of the listening capacity has diminished over time, musical abilities must necessarily be impaired. Improving the listening capacity will enhance both the physical ability to perform and the emotional response to appreciate music. Sound Therapy works on the listening capacity in several ways. The physical structures of the ear are stimulated to enhance their performance. Auditory pathways in the brain are activated, making processing of auditory information faster and more efficient, and the emotional psyche is opened on new levels by the process of sonic birth that is stimulated through the high frequency filtering.

To learn more about how Sound Therapy could improve musical performance, request one of our Free Reports.

Meniere’s / Vertigo

Sound Therapy and Meniere’s/Vertigo

Meniere’s disease, a combination of vertigo, hearing loss and tinnitus, may be one of the most debilitating conditions a person can suffer from. Sudden dizzy attacks, often severe enough to cause nausea and vomiting, come unexpectedly and can incapacitate the sufferer for weeks at a time. Sound Therapy has brought welcome and lasting relief to many Meniere’s sufferers, and has been able to restore normal living to those who previously lived in horror of the unpredictable sense of spinning out of control which could be triggered by lifts, staircases, heights, and large gatherings.

Living with Meniere’s

In 1861 Dr Prosper Meniere, who was in charge of the Imperial Institute for Deaf Mutes in Paris , identified and described the condition now known as Meniere’s Disease. His description was this:

“A man, young and robust, suddenly without reason, experienced vertigo, nausea and vomiting. He had a state of inexpressible anguish and prostration. The face was pale and bathed in sweat as if about to faint. Often, and at the same time, the patient, after seeming to stagger in a dazed state, fell on the ground unable to get up. Lying on his back he could not open his eyes without his environment becoming a whirlpool. The smallest movements of the head worsened the feeling of vertigo and nausea.”

Not everyone experiences this extreme form of Meniere’s, but it is characterised by sudden and recurrent attacks. It is usually accompanied by tinnitus, low frequency hearing loss and a feeling of pressure in the affected ear. It is often associated also with sensitivity to loud sounds.

Although there are other forms of vertigo, true Meniere’s is caused by an increase in pressure on the fluids in the inner ear. Sound Therapy is quite effective in the treatment of this condition. See How does Sound Therapy help Meniere’s?

Meniere’s is caused by problems in the vestibular system, causing balance disorders as well as hearing loss, so by energising and stimulating the system, Sound Therapy usually gets good results with Meniere’s disease.

This also helps in the area of hearing loss, though in the case of Meniere’s disease what bothers people most is the loss of balance. For balance disorders Sound Therapy is quite effective. When the balance issue is resolved, people are generally not so concerned with the tinnitus or hearing.

Tomatis had a unique theory on how Sound Therapy helps to alleviate Meniere’s Syndrome. He believed that the excess pressure in the vestibular system (the semicircular canals) is caused by spasms or twitches in the stirrup muscle. The stirrup muscle is one of the middle ear muscles and its role is to regulate the pressure on the inner ear fluid. The footplate of the stirrup presses on the oval window, the membrane which separates the middle ear from the inner ear chamber. Therefore when the stirrup muscle goes into spasm, there is a sudden change in the pressure in the inner ear fluid, causing a disturbance like a sudden storm to pass through the semi-circular canals. This communicates to the brain via the vestibular branch of the auditory nerve, that there is sudden movement of the head, which gives the patient the feeling that the world is spinning or falling away beneath them. Tomatis explains that once the stirrup muscle has been rehabilitated with the regular exercise provided by the Sound Therapy program, it no longer goes into spasm and the Meniere’s attacks do not recur.

Information Sheet on how Sound Therapy can assist with Menieres/Vertigo

To learn more about how Sound Therapy could help Meniere’s disease, request one of our Free Reports.

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